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Wednesday, May 10, 2017

5 Yummy Picture Books for Asian American / Pacific American Heritage Month

May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month, celebrating generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched the culture of the United States. What better way to explore cultural diversity than through stories, art and delicious food?  Most of these fun illustrated books for children include recipes, so you can try cooking the food from the stories at home.

  



Hot, Hot, Roti for Dada-Ji, by F. Zia

Aneel’s grandfather, Dada-ji, amazes him with tall tales of the feats that he could accomplish in his boyhood fueled by the power of his mother’s delicious roti. Motivated by his grandfather’s stories, Aneel decides they simply must make some of this traditional Indian fried bread right away.



A young girl wonders why her mother’s garden doesn’t look like the neighbors' gardens, which are blooming with pretty flowers. Mother explains that they are growing something better than flowers - these odd-looking Chinese vegetables will make the most delicious soup. This book includes a pronunciation guide and a recipe for “ugly vegetable soup.”


Bee-Bim Bop, Linda Sue Park

An eager girl helps her mother make the traditional Korean rice dish Bi-Bim Bop. From a shopping trip for ingredients to setting the table and eating, the story is written in upbeat rhyming text that is ideal for group storytimes. The book also includes the author’s own recipe.





Cora Cooks Pancit, by Dorina K. Lazo

Garbed in her grandfather’s red apron, Cora finally gets the chance to be Mama's assistant chef and help make pancit, her favorite Filipino noodle dish. Family and food are intertwined in this charming tale about the trials of being the youngest and smallest family member.


Dumpling Soup, by Jama Kim Rattigan

Set in Hawaii, this story weaves together a variety of cultural traditions as Marisa helps her grandmother make their family’s traditional dumpling soup to celebrate the new year. The dumplings she forms with her novice fingers look a little funny, though – will they taste as good as she remembers? 

Do you have a favorite book that would help people learn more about your culture?  Let us know in the comments field.


-Suzanne LaPierre, City of Fairfax Library

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