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Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Get Your Vote On


Election Day is approaching quickly and librarians across the county are busy answering questions ranging from “Where do I mail my absentee ballot?” to “How does the electoral college work anyway?” As county residents gear up to cast their votes Tuesday, November 8, we want to make sure you have the resources and information you need. So get ready, get the facts and get your vote on!


And for that Electoral College 101? The answer to almost every question you could think of is available on the National Archives and Records Administration US Electoral College FAQ page.

Where, When and How to Vote

Fairfax County Office of Elections has all the important dates and information county residents need to make sure they are ready on Election Day.

Residents of other counties in Virginia can use the handy Virginia Voter Information webpage from the Virginia Department of Elections to locate information for their county.

The Resources for Voters page from the United States Election Assistance Commission and the Voting and Elections page on the USA.gov website have a plethora of resources on voting information nationwide, including voter guides and resources for military and overseas voters.

Where To Get Your Facts Checked 
Votesmart’s mission is “to provide free, factual, unbiased information on candidates and elected officials" and does not accept donations from special interest groups or organizations and corporations that are politically active. You can view a variety of information, ranging from voting records and issue positions to campaign funding.

GovTrack.US identifies itself as a completely independent entity, receiving no outside funding, whose mission is “to track the United States Congress and help Americans understand what is going on in their national legislature.” You can view the voting records and bills sponsored by elected officials, as well as track bills through the legislative process.

Politifact, operated by the Tampa Bay Times and other media affiliates, researches “statements from members of Congress, the President and presidential candidates, Cabinet secretaries and lobbyists and then rates them for accuracy.” It won the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting.

FactCheck.org is a “nonpartisan, nonprofit, consumer advocate for voters that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics.” It's a project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

Looking for voting information with a local slant? The Voter’s Guide of the League of Women Voters of the Fairfax Area has both national and local election information, including a non-partisan Voters' Guide for the 2016 Presidential Elections and a personalized voter ballot tool.



1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I love "librarian-approved" election resources. It can be a challenge to find accurate, balanced, non-sensational news about anything to do with politics. Libraries are stalwarts when it comes to helping people get the real story.